Concerned? Worried about the future?
Scared you won't be able to succeed?
By Trans people about Trans people.
These are our role models.



Photo 2 Mar 18 notes Zheng He (often referred to as Cheng Ho) was the powerful eunuch admiral of The Treasure Fleets.  Decades before Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue in search of a water route to Asia, the Chinese were exploring the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific with seven voyages of the “Treasure Fleet” that solidified Chinese control over much of Asia in the 15th century.  Cheng Ho was born around 1371 in China’s southwestern Yunan Province (just north of Laos) with the name Ma Ho. Ma Ho’s father was a Muslim hajji (who had made a pilgrimage to Mecca) and the family name of Ma was used by Muslims in representation of the word Mohammed.  When Ma Ho was ten years old (around 1381), he was captured along with other children when the Chinese army invaded Yunan to take control over the region. At the age of 13 he transitioned and he was placed as a servant in the household of the Chinese Emperor’s fourth son (out of twenty-six total sons), Prince Zhu Di.  Ma Ho proved himself to be an exceptional servant to Prince Zhu Di. He became skilled in the arts of war and diplomacy and served as an officer of the prince. Zhu Di renamed Ma Ho as Cheng Ho because his horse was killed in battle outside of a place called Zhenglunba. (Cheng Ho is also Zheng He in the newer Pinyin transliteration of Chinese but he’s still most commonly called Cheng Ho). Cheng Ho was also known as San Bao which means “three jewels.”
Cheng Ho, who was said to have been seven feet tall, was given greater power when Zhu Di became emperor in 1402. One year later, Zhu Di appointed Cheng Ho admiral and ordered him to oversee the construction of a Treasure Fleet to explore the seas surrounding China. Admiral Cheng Ho was the first eunuch appointed to such a high military position in China.  Reportedly, there were seven voyages of exploration and trade.  Zheng He visited India, Vietnam, Java, and Malacca, and then headed west across the Indian Ocean to Sri Lanka and Calicut and Cochin (cities on the southwest coast of India). On the return voyage home of the first trip, the Treasure Fleet was forced to battle pirates near Sumatra for several months. Eventually Cheng Ho’s men managed to capture the pirate leader and take him to the Chinese capital Nanjing, arriving in 1407.  For the second voyage, he chose to remain in China to oversee the repair of a temple at the birthplace of a favorite goddess while his crew set out.  The fleet’s third voyage (Cheng Ho’s second) from 1409 to 1411 consisted of 48 ships and 30,000 men. It followed closely the route of the first voyage but the Treasure Fleet established entrepots (warehouses) and stockades along their route to facilitate trade and storage of goods. On the second voyage the King of Ceylon (Sri Lanka) was aggressive; Cheng Ho defeated the king’s forces and captured the king to take him to Nanjing.
In the summer of 1415, the Treasure Fleet returned from its fourth voyage with Cheng with a bounty of trade goods from the Persian Gulf. Detachments of this expedition sailed south along the eastern coast of Africa almost as far south as Mozambique. During each of Cheng Ho’s voyages, he brought back diplomats from other countries or encouraged ambassadors to go to the capital Nanjing on their own. The fifth voyage was ordered in 1416 to return the ambassadors who had arrived from other countries. A sixth voyage was launched in the spring of 1421 and visited Southeast Asia, India, the Persian Gulf, and Africa. By this time, Africa was considered China’s “El Dorado,” a source of riches. Cheng Ho returned in late 1421 but the remainder of the fleet didn’t arrive in China until 1422. Emperor Zhu Di died in 1424 and his son Zhu Gaozhi became emperor. He canceled the voyages of the Treasure Fleets and ordered ship builders and sailors to stop their work and return home. Cheng Ho was appointed military commander of Nanjing.  The leadership of Zhu Gaozhi did not last long - he died in 1426 at the age of 26. His son and Zhu Di’s grandson Zhu Zhanji took Zhu Gaozhi’s place. Zhu Zhanji was much more like his grandfather than his father was and in 1430 he resumed the Treasure Fleet voyages by ordering Cheng Ho to resume his duties as admiral and make a seventh voyage in an attempt to restore peaceful relations with the kingdoms of Malacca and Siam. It took a year to gear up for the voyage which departed as a large expedition with 100 ships and 27,500 men. On the return trip in 1433 Cheng Ho is believed to have died; others state that he died in 1435 after the return to China.
[About the gender Castrato and Eunuch]

Zheng He (often referred to as Cheng Ho) was the powerful eunuch admiral of The Treasure Fleets.  Decades before Christopher Columbus sailed the ocean blue in search of a water route to Asia, the Chinese were exploring the Indian Ocean and Western Pacific with seven voyages of the “Treasure Fleet” that solidified Chinese control over much of Asia in the 15th century.  Cheng Ho was born around 1371 in China’s southwestern Yunan Province (just north of Laos) with the name Ma Ho. Ma Ho’s father was a Muslim hajji (who had made a pilgrimage to Mecca) and the family name of Ma was used by Muslims in representation of the word Mohammed.  When Ma Ho was ten years old (around 1381), he was captured along with other children when the Chinese army invaded Yunan to take control over the region. At the age of 13 he transitioned and he was placed as a servant in the household of the Chinese Emperor’s fourth son (out of twenty-six total sons), Prince Zhu Di.  Ma Ho proved himself to be an exceptional servant to Prince Zhu Di. He became skilled in the arts of war and diplomacy and served as an officer of the prince. Zhu Di renamed Ma Ho as Cheng Ho because his horse was killed in battle outside of a place called Zhenglunba. (Cheng Ho is also Zheng He in the newer Pinyin transliteration of Chinese but he’s still most commonly called Cheng Ho). Cheng Ho was also known as San Bao which means “three jewels.”

Cheng Ho, who was said to have been seven feet tall, was given greater power when Zhu Di became emperor in 1402. One year later, Zhu Di appointed Cheng Ho admiral and ordered him to oversee the construction of a Treasure Fleet to explore the seas surrounding China. Admiral Cheng Ho was the first eunuch appointed to such a high military position in China.  Reportedly, there were seven voyages of exploration and trade.  Zheng He visited India, Vietnam, Java, and Malacca, and then headed west across the Indian Ocean to Sri Lanka and Calicut and Cochin (cities on the southwest coast of India). On the return voyage home of the first trip, the Treasure Fleet was forced to battle pirates near Sumatra for several months. Eventually Cheng Ho’s men managed to capture the pirate leader and take him to the Chinese capital Nanjing, arriving in 1407.  For the second voyage, he chose to remain in China to oversee the repair of a temple at the birthplace of a favorite goddess while his crew set out.  The fleet’s third voyage (Cheng Ho’s second) from 1409 to 1411 consisted of 48 ships and 30,000 men. It followed closely the route of the first voyage but the Treasure Fleet established entrepots (warehouses) and stockades along their route to facilitate trade and storage of goods. On the second voyage the King of Ceylon (Sri Lanka) was aggressive; Cheng Ho defeated the king’s forces and captured the king to take him to Nanjing.

In the summer of 1415, the Treasure Fleet returned from its fourth voyage with Cheng with a bounty of trade goods from the Persian Gulf. Detachments of this expedition sailed south along the eastern coast of Africa almost as far south as Mozambique. During each of Cheng Ho’s voyages, he brought back diplomats from other countries or encouraged ambassadors to go to the capital Nanjing on their own. The fifth voyage was ordered in 1416 to return the ambassadors who had arrived from other countries. A sixth voyage was launched in the spring of 1421 and visited Southeast Asia, India, the Persian Gulf, and Africa. By this time, Africa was considered China’s “El Dorado,” a source of riches. Cheng Ho returned in late 1421 but the remainder of the fleet didn’t arrive in China until 1422. Emperor Zhu Di died in 1424 and his son Zhu Gaozhi became emperor. He canceled the voyages of the Treasure Fleets and ordered ship builders and sailors to stop their work and return home. Cheng Ho was appointed military commander of Nanjing.  The leadership of Zhu Gaozhi did not last long - he died in 1426 at the age of 26. His son and Zhu Di’s grandson Zhu Zhanji took Zhu Gaozhi’s place. Zhu Zhanji was much more like his grandfather than his father was and in 1430 he resumed the Treasure Fleet voyages by ordering Cheng Ho to resume his duties as admiral and make a seventh voyage in an attempt to restore peaceful relations with the kingdoms of Malacca and Siam. It took a year to gear up for the voyage which departed as a large expedition with 100 ships and 27,500 men. On the return trip in 1433 Cheng Ho is believed to have died; others state that he died in 1435 after the return to China.

[About the gender Castrato and Eunuch]

  1. ealperin reblogged this from transsuccess
  2. apotheosisofacedelaserna reblogged this from transsuccess and added:
    Zheng He (often referred to as Cheng Ho) was the powerful eunuch admiral of The Treasure Fleets. Decades before...
  3. mrfrivolous reblogged this from crankyskirt
  4. crankyskirt reblogged this from transsuccess
  5. transsuccess posted this

Search Tags by Profession: