Concerned? Worried about the future?
Scared you won't be able to succeed?
By Trans people about Trans people.
These are our role models.



Photo 24 Jan 333 notes Claude Cahun (1894-1954) was a French artist, photographer and writer. Her work was both political and personal, often playing with the concepts of gender and sexuality. She was the niece of writer Marcel Schwob and the great-niece of Orientalist David Léon Cahun. Her mother’s mental problems meant that she was brought up by her paternal grandmother, Mathilde Cahun. She began making photographic self-portraits as early as 1912, when she was 18 years old, and she continued taking images of herself through the 1930s. Around 1919, she settled on the pseudonym Claude Cahun, intentionally selecting a sexually ambiguous name, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas). During the early 20s, she settled in Paris with her life-long partner and stepsister Suzanne Malherbe. For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe (who adopted the pseudonym “Marcel Moore”) collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. She published articles and novels, notably in the periodical “Mercure de France”.
Around 1922 she and Malherbe began holding artists’ salons at their home. Cahun’s work encompassed writing, photography, and theater. She is most remembered for her highly-staged self portraits and tableaux that incorporated the visual aesthetics of Surrealism. Her published writings include “Heroines,” (1925) a series of monologues based upon female fairy tale characters and intertwining them with witty comparisons to the contemporary image of women; Aveux non avenus, (Carrefour, 1930) a book of essays and recorded dreams illustrated with photomontages; and several essays in magazines and journals. Cahun’s life was marked by a sense of role reversal, and her public identity became a commentary upon not only her own, but the public’s notions of sexuality, gender, beauty, and logic. Her adoption of a sexually ambiguous name, and her androgynous self-portraits display a revolutionary way of thinking and creating, experimenting with her audience’s understanding of photography as a documentation of reality. Her poetry challenged gender roles and attacked the increasingly modern world’s social and economic boundaries. Also Cahun’s participation in the Parisian Surrealist movement diversified the group’s artwork and ushered in new representations. Where most Surrealist artists were men, and their primary images were of women as isolated symbols of eroticism, Cahun epitomized the chameleonic and multiple possibilities of the female identity.
In 1932 she joined the Association des Écrivains et Artistes Révolutionnaires. Following this, she started associating with the surrealist group, and later participated in a number of surrealist exhibitions, including the London International Surrealist Exhibition (New Burlington Gallery) and Exposition surréaliste d’Objets (Charles Ratton Gallery, Paris), both in 1936. In 1934, she published a short polemic essay, Les Paris sont Ouverts, and in 1935 took part in the founding of the left-wing group Contre Attaque.  In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti-German fliers. Many were snippets from English-to-German translations of BBC reports on the Nazi’s crimes and insolence, which were pasted together to create rhythmic poems and harsh criticism. The couple then dressed up and attended many German military events in Jersey, strategically placing them in soldier’s pockets, on their chairs, etc. Also, fliers were inconspicuously crumpled up and thrown into cars and windows. In many ways, Cahun and Malherbe’s resistance efforts were not only political but artistic actions.
Note:In some areas this role model is listed as a trans male, however, due to the fact that she appeared to go back and forth between multiple genders, we are listing her under Androgyne and Genderfluid.  Apologies for any incorrect pronouns, there is no mention of Claude’s preferences.

Claude Cahun (1894-1954) was a French artist, photographer and writer. Her work was both political and personal, often playing with the concepts of gender and sexuality. She was the niece of writer Marcel Schwob and the great-niece of Orientalist David Léon Cahun. Her mother’s mental problems meant that she was brought up by her paternal grandmother, Mathilde Cahun. She began making photographic self-portraits as early as 1912, when she was 18 years old, and she continued taking images of herself through the 1930s. Around 1919, she settled on the pseudonym Claude Cahun, intentionally selecting a sexually ambiguous name, after having previously used the names Claude Courlis (after the curlew) and Daniel Douglas (after Lord Alfred Douglas). During the early 20s, she settled in Paris with her life-long partner and stepsister Suzanne Malherbe. For the rest of their lives together, Cahun and Malherbe (who adopted the pseudonym “Marcel Moore”) collaborated on various written works, sculptures, photomontages and collages. She published articles and novels, notably in the periodical “Mercure de France”.

Around 1922 she and Malherbe began holding artists’ salons at their home. Cahun’s work encompassed writing, photography, and theater. She is most remembered for her highly-staged self portraits and tableaux that incorporated the visual aesthetics of Surrealism. Her published writings include “Heroines,” (1925) a series of monologues based upon female fairy tale characters and intertwining them with witty comparisons to the contemporary image of women; Aveux non avenus, (Carrefour, 1930) a book of essays and recorded dreams illustrated with photomontages; and several essays in magazines and journals. Cahun’s life was marked by a sense of role reversal, and her public identity became a commentary upon not only her own, but the public’s notions of sexuality, gender, beauty, and logic. Her adoption of a sexually ambiguous name, and her androgynous self-portraits display a revolutionary way of thinking and creating, experimenting with her audience’s understanding of photography as a documentation of reality. Her poetry challenged gender roles and attacked the increasingly modern world’s social and economic boundaries. Also Cahun’s participation in the Parisian Surrealist movement diversified the group’s artwork and ushered in new representations. Where most Surrealist artists were men, and their primary images were of women as isolated symbols of eroticism, Cahun epitomized the chameleonic and multiple possibilities of the female identity.

In 1932 she joined the Association des Écrivains et Artistes Révolutionnaires. Following this, she started associating with the surrealist group, and later participated in a number of surrealist exhibitions, including the London International Surrealist Exhibition (New Burlington Gallery) and Exposition surréaliste d’Objets (Charles Ratton Gallery, Paris), both in 1936. In 1934, she published a short polemic essay, Les Paris sont Ouverts, and in 1935 took part in the founding of the left-wing group Contre Attaque.  In 1937 Cahun and Malherbe settled in Jersey. Following the fall of France and the German occupation of Jersey and the other Channel Islands, they became active as resistance workers and propagandists. Fervently against war, the two worked extensively in producing anti-German fliers. Many were snippets from English-to-German translations of BBC reports on the Nazi’s crimes and insolence, which were pasted together to create rhythmic poems and harsh criticism. The couple then dressed up and attended many German military events in Jersey, strategically placing them in soldier’s pockets, on their chairs, etc. Also, fliers were inconspicuously crumpled up and thrown into cars and windows. In many ways, Cahun and Malherbe’s resistance efforts were not only political but artistic actions.

Note:In some areas this role model is listed as a trans male, however, due to the fact that she appeared to go back and forth between multiple genders, we are listing her under Androgyne and Genderfluid. Apologies for any incorrect pronouns, there is no mention of Claude’s preferences.

  1. i-k-h reblogged this from liminalgreys
  2. liminalgreys reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  3. awkward0w1 reblogged this from gwydionmisha
  4. gwydionmisha reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  5. ufopeople reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  6. trashprincesss reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  7. uccellini reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  8. artisticgasm reblogged this from jaydynamite
  9. jaydynamite reblogged this from twinkprivilege
  10. omgitsfullofstars reblogged this from twinkprivilege
  11. saline-thesaltlakequeen reblogged this from twinkprivilege
  12. twinkprivilege reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  13. thegreatbigsomewhere reblogged this from mocasia
  14. myinnergentlemanwearstights reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage
  15. ginevrawokolo reblogged this from toasterb0t
  16. the-great-disappointment reblogged this from toasterb0t
  17. toasterb0t reblogged this from gorgonetta
  18. fuckhvornice reblogged this from transsuccess
  19. trashedpotential reblogged this from cutealienbabe
  20. toad-ready-to-party reblogged this from fyeahqueervintage and added:
    It’s crazy to imagine people like this being alive back then! If she can do it in the early 20th century I guess I can’t...
  21. anortherncalamity reblogged this from goodnightandgreatlove
  22. cinnamon-strawberry reblogged this from spockquaman and added:
    ooh I really want to read some of her stuff now
  23. aelphabathropp reblogged this from lord-kitschener

Search Tags by Profession: